Malaysia top in ASEAN and Asia for road fatality | An Insurance Dilemma

Motor vehicle collision…. ever thought of underwriting third party insurance on motorcycle? What about increasing the private car comprehensive motor insurance premium – by way of more loading? Will the motor insurance premium takes a dive when the motor segment of our insurance industry detariffed in 2016? These are posers for dilemma…. and more so with this recent report concerning Malaysian Boleh again….

The Asia Insurance Review….

Malaysia and three other Asean member states are among 25 countries in the world with the highest number of deaths from road crashes as a percentage of fatalities from all causes of death, according to a university study.

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New Straits Times frontpage, friday, february 28 2014

Researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, using data from the World Health Organization, found that when it comes to the greatest number of deaths from road crashes as a percentage of fatalities from all causes of death, Malaysia was at the top of the list for Asean and Asia, with a rate of 6.0 percent. The other Asean states are Thailand (5.1 percent); Brunei (4.4 percent) and Vietnam (3.7 percent).

Worldwide, Malaysia ranked 8th, Thailand 12th, Brunei 17th and Vietnam 25th.  The study covered a total of 193 countries.

Globally, it was found that road crash fatalities make up only 2.1 percent of fatalities from all causes. The United Arab Emirates was ranked the country with the highest percentage in road crash fatalities at 15.9 percent.

The Malay Mail Online reported that studies (data for 2008 from the World Health Organisation), found that road accidents caused 30 deaths for every 100,000 people in Malaysia’s population. That meant that 6.0 per cent of all deaths in the country were caused by road accident fatalities. Roads accidents in Thailand caused 44 deaths per 100,000 of people, making it the second most deadly country for road accidents. Namibia topped the list with 45 deaths per 100,000 of the population. In comparison, coronary heart disease made up 17 per cent of total deaths in Malaysia, making it the number one killer in the country. The other two main killers in Malaysia were cancer, which made up 15 per cent of total deaths and stroke at 9 per cent.

Some Malaysian statistics

[This is something interesting that I picked up from an article written by one Muhammad Marizwan Abdul Manan and András Várhelyi on motorcycle fatalities in Malaysia, which was published in February 2012]. According to their reserach, Malaysia has the highest road fatality risk (per 100,000 population) among the ASEAN countries and some 60% of the road accident fatalities involve motorcyclists (Chart | Fatality Distribution by mode of transport). The analysis of data from the police, government authorities, and national and international research institutes (much of those data were based on 2009) reveals that the highest numbers of such road accident fatalities were a result of motorcycle fatalities occur in rural locations (61%), on primary roads (62%) and on straight road sections (66%).The majority are riders (89%), 16 to 20 years old (22.5%), and 90% of the motorcycles are privately owned. Of those involved in fatal accidents, 75% of the motorcyclists wear helmets, and 35% do not have proper licences. The highest number of fatalities by type of collision is ‘angular or side’ (27.5%).

The Mat Rem-pits factors….

Although fatal motorcyclist crashes mostly involve ‘passenger cars’ (28%), motorcyclists are responsible for 50% of the collisions either by crashing singly (25%) or with other motorcyclists (25%). While male motorcyclists predominate (94% of fatalities), female motorcyclists aged 31 to 70, possessing ‘no licence’, not wearing helmets and travelling during the day, account for a higher percentage than male motorcyclists. The study has also established that young male motorcyclists are prone to fatal crashes in the evenings and on weekends on rural primary roads, especially on straight road sections.

“….(Mat Rem-pits….mostly) that young male motorcyclists are prone to fatal crashes in the evenings and on weekends on rural primary roads, especially straight road sections.”

The ASEAN 58% motorcycle dilemma….

However, Malaysia’s motorcycle fatalities are not among the worst in the Association of South East Asian Nations, ASEAN. Motorcycles constitute approximately 58% of the vehicles in ASEAN countries, and over the last decade the motorcycle has been the major contributor with 52%, to road traffic fatalities. If we compare motorcycle fatalities per 10,000-registered motorcycles in each country, Malaysia ranks seventh. The three highest are Cambodia (75.1), Lao P.D.R (9.6) and Singapore (7.1) in terms of motorcycle fatalities per 10,000 registered motorcycles. Nonetheless, Malaysia has the highest number of road fatalities per 100,000 population.

Malaysian road accident fatalitiesIn Malaysia, dangerous road conditions and unsafe vehicles are among the reasons given by netizens for the reportedly high road fatality rate. But the biggest contributor to death on the roads is the bad attitude of Malaysians drivers, reported The Star newspaper. Of course, the Mat Rempits….(preferring to die young) are the culprits that created the spike in the fatality statistics. Among common driving sins are changing lanes without signalling, using mobile devices while driving, swerving dangerously in and out of traffic, and speeding.

You can click to read the article that was also written by Asia Insurance Review: http://www.asiainsurancereview.com/News/View-NewsLetter-Article/id/29561/Type/eDaily

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2 comments for “Malaysia top in ASEAN and Asia for road fatality | An Insurance Dilemma

  1. mee lane
    March 1, 2014 at 23:33

    This sentence says it all:
    Although fatal motorcyclist crashes mostly involve ‘passenger cars’ (28%), motorcyclists are responsible for 50% of the collisions either by crashing singly (25%) or with other motorcyclists (25%). While male motorcyclists predominate (94% of fatalities), female motorcyclists aged 31 to 70, possessing ‘no licence’, not wearing helmets and travelling during the day, account for a higher percentage than male motorcyclists. The study has also established that young male motorcyclists are prone to fatal crashes in the evenings and on weekends on rural primary roads, especially on straight road sections.

    • March 10, 2014 at 23:30

      Kampung folks and mat rempits are the major component of fatalities.

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